SBUBolivar, Missouri Est. 1878

Biology Major at Southwest Baptist University

Many careers begin with a strong foundation in biology.

Students majoring in biology will pursue one of three possible concentrations depending on their career plans:

Biomedical Science — Students interested in the health sciences will concentrate in Biomedical Science. This path prepares students to pursue advanced studies in medicine, dentistry, physician assistant, optometry, physical therapy, pharmacy, and veterinary science.

Environmental Biology/Field Biology — This emphasis is good preparation for work with agencies such as the Department of Conservation and the Department of Natural Resources.

General Biology — A concentration available for those who want to tailor their academic program to their interests.


The SBU Advantage

  • All full-time faculty have earned PhDs and teach all labs and lectures personally.
  • Our faculty represent a range of life science fields.
  • Small class sizes mean plenty of hands-on help and interaction with professors.
  • More than 80% of our biology majors seeking to enter graduate school are accepted.

Special features

SBU’s Biology program can be tailored to fit a student’s specific career path in a medical profession:

  • Pre-Health Programs
  • Pre-Medicine
  • Pre-Dentistry
  • Pre-Optometry
  • Pre-Veterinary
  • Pre-Pharmacy
  • Pre-Physician Assistant
  • Pre-Physical Therapy Program

SBU has a Pre-Health Careers Committee consisting of faculty from the departments of biology and chemistry. This committee is dedicated to preparing and sending out SBU students who wish to become health care professionals such as doctors, physician assistants, pharmacists, dentists, and optometrists. The SBU Pre-Health Careers Committee provides a number of services to these pre-health students.

The Biology Department at SBU has an undergraduate program of study in which students can prepare for entrance into the SBU Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program. This program of study leads to a B.S. Degree in Biology and incorporates required entrance course work for the SBU DPT program. Other admission requirements for the SBU DPT should be obtained directly from the Department of Physical Therapy, Southwest Baptist University, Bolivar, MO, 65613, (417) 328-1672. Admissions to the SBU DPT program is based on competitive applications.

Engaged Learning

Biology classrooms are equipped with current technology and our faculty use a variety of teaching techniques. Labs are taught in a hands-on fashion engaging students in observation and experimentation and are small in size allowing for individual interaction.

Course Information

All students majoring in biology must complete the biology core curriculum consisting of courses totaling 24 credit hours. In addition, majors will also complete a concentration which includes 16 credit hours.

Clubs and Organizations

Pre-Physical Therapy Student Organization: Members include those undergraduate students from any discipline who are interested in the physical therapy profession. Monthly meetings are held for information and fellowship purposes. The organization has also been involved in several service opportunities.

Biology Club: Members are involved in service projects and planning social events.

Pre-Health Society: Pre-Health Society is an open club for students who are interested in pursuing a career in a health-related field. The club meets once a month for group meetings, planning service events, and hearing guest speakers from various health fields. The club is a mix of all classes and gives younger students the chance to meet the older students who can encourage them in chosen fields and help them through the challenging parts of pursuing a career in a health field.

Scholarships

Margaret A. Kort Biology Scholarship

The Margaret A. Kort Biology Scholarship fund is an endowed scholarship fund established in honor of Dr. Margaret A. Kort’s long years of service to SBU and the department of biology. This scholarship has been established by faculty and friends for the purpose of providing one or more scholarships per year for SBU students majoring in the field of biology.

Frank & Evelyn Huser Scholarship

For a student preparing for a career in biology on the graduate level or, if none, then to a biology education major. The recipient must have completed a minimum of eight hours in biology and an overall 3.0 grade point average.

Friends of the College of Science and Mathematics Scholarship

The School of Arts and Sciences Scholarship fund is an endowed scholarship fund established by the curators and friends of the School of Arts and Sciences. Scholarship recipients will be students who have matriculated at SBU with a major in the College of Science and Mathematics. Recipients must have achieved high academic honors at SBU and show a good balance between the academic, spiritual, and social aspects of campus life.

Dr. Irl Tremain

For a student preparing for a career in the biological sciences.

Lucy C. Tremain

For a student preparing for a career in the biological sciences, preferably in the field of ecology or population biology.

Community Foundation of the Ozarks/Smith-Glynn-Callaway Medical Foundation

The Smith-Glynn-Callaway Medical Foundation has granted to SBU funds to provide scholarships for students engaged in pre-medical, pre-dental and pre-optometry endeavors. Recipients are selected annually by the SBU Pre-Health Careers Committee, with preference given to juniors and seniors with an overall average grade point average of 3.50 or higher.

Career Opportunities

Our graduates are working in as doctors and physician assistants, physical therapists, dentists, laboratory researchers, conservation biologists, and forensic scientists.

Degree Requirements

BIO 1111 Biology Colloquium
Presentation and discussion of biological topics, current events, and opportunities in the field. One lecture each week.
BIO 2134 General Zoology
An introduction to the principles of classification of animals. Animal life will be examined with respect to cell organization, genetics, evolution, anatomy/physiology, and interaction of animals with their environment. Three lectures; one laboratory each week.
BIO 2234 General Botany
A study of the plant world. Fungi, algae, bryophytes, seedless vascular plants, gymnosperms and angiosperms will be studied with regard to their life history, morphology, physiology and taxonomic relationships. Three lectures, one lab each week.
BIO/CHE 3012 Methods in Scientific Research
A study of the principles and techniques used to develop and construct a scientific proposal. Topics include statistical analysis, experimental design, developing a proposal, determining a budget, and scientific presentations. Two lectures each week.
BIO 3324 Genetics
Fundamental principles of immunology and serology. The structure and function of the immune system, antigen-antibody interaction, other serological reaction, immunoglobulin formation and immunosuppression. Two lectures each week.
BIO 3334 Ecology
Study of the relations of animals and plants to each other and to their environment. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
BIO 4224 Cell and Molecular Biology
The study of the structure and function of cellular organelles, cell transport, signal transduction, apoptosis, and cell cycle. DNA, transcription, translation, replication, control, repair, and gene expression will be studied as well as an introduction to bioinformatics within these disciplines. Three lectures, one laboratory each week
BIO 4471 Seminar in Biology
Investigation of biological literature related to selected topics and presentation of scientific material for group discussion and evaluation. One session each week.
CHE 1115 General Chemistry I
A study of the fundamental laws and theories involved in chemical changes. Topics will include atomic theory, thermochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Stress will be on the solving of mathematical problems which illustrate the principles of chemistry. The course is designed principally for students planning on careers related to the natural sciences. Four lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 1125 General Chemistry II
A continuation of CHE 1115 covering chemical equilibrium, oxidation-reduction, acid-base theory, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, the basics of coordination chemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Four lectures, one laboratory each week.
SCF Biology Through the Eyes of Faith
Study from the biblical perspective of the unique nature of biology and its interaction with Christian thought. Working from the authority of the Scriptures and the conviction that Christianity is true, this course examines the history of biology, emphasizing the interactions of the life sciences with society in medicine, genetics and the environment.
Choose a set of two additional courses from the following:
CHE 3304 Organic Chemistry I
Study of the theory and mechanisms of the basic reactions of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis on alkyl halides, alkanes, alkenes, stereochemistry, alicyclics, alkynes and dienes. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
CHE 3314 Organic Chemistry II
Continuation of CHE 3304. Emphasis on aromatic compounds, interpretive spectroscopy, alcohols, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, amines and ethers. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
PHY 1115 General Physics I
A non-calculus physics course emphasizing the fundamental concepts of mechanics, heat and wave motion. Designed for pre-physical therapy, science education, biology, pre-medical, pre-veterinary, pre-optometry and pre-pharmacy majors. Four lectures, one laboratory period each week.
PHY 1125 General Physics II
A non-calculus physics course emphasizing the fundamental concepts of mechanics, heat and wave motion. Designed for pre-physical therapy, science education, biology, pre-medical, pre-veterinary, pre-optometry and pre-pharmacy majors. Four lectures, one laboratory period each week.
MAT 1195 Analytics and Calculus I
This course studies graphs, functions, plane analytical geometry, limits, continuity, derivatives, velocity-acceleration, rates of change, maxima and minima, differentials, the Mean Value Theorems for integrals and derivatives, antiderivatives, definite integrals, area, and methods of finding volumes.
MAT 2255 Analytics and Calculus II
This course examines derivatives and integrals of functions and their inverses including exponential and logarithmic functions. It also investigates techniques of integration, further applications of integrals, sequences, series, polar coordinates, applications of parametric equations, and conic sections.
CIS 1144 Computer Science I
This course introduces the concepts of computer programming and problem solving and the associated ideas of algorithms and data structures. It is designed to provide the serious computer science student with basic skills and a solid foundation for further study. Includes an introduction to the Java programming language. Three lectures, one lab per week.
CIS 1154 Computer Science II
This course is a continuation of CIS 1144 with emphasis upon good programming methodology (software engineering). The data structures of linked lists, stacks, queues and trees are developed along with an introduction to file structures. Recursion, searching and sorting algorithms are analyzed for order as well as time and space efficiency . Parallel sorting and searching algorithms are introduced. Java is utilized for programming. Three lectures and one lab per week.
Plus choose one of the following Biology concentrations:

Biomedical Science (Prehealth Professional, Graduate Studies)

BIO 2204 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
An introduction to the study of form and function of the human body. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence. Particular attention will be given to the study of cells, tissues, and metabolism, as well as the skeletal, muscular, respiratory and digestive systems. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
BIO 3304 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This course is a continuation of Biology 2204. Areas of study will include: the nervous, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, and the urogenital systems. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
Eight hours of elective courses from the following:
BIO 3314 Microbiology
A study of the cultural characteristics, morphology, metabolism, taxonomy and infection of microorganisms, with emphasis on methods of isolation, growth and identification. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
BIO 3322 Immunology
Fundamental principles of immunology and serology. The structure and function of the immune system, antigen-antibody interaction, other serological reaction, immunoglobulin formation and immunosuppression. Two lectures each week.
BIO 3344 Vertebrate Physiology
Study of the functional process of vertebrate organs and organ systems and their physiological integration. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
BIO/CHE 3364 Biochemistry
A study of the chemistry and metabolism of biologically important compounds. Includes the biochemistry of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, nucleic acids and the energetics of living organisms. Three lectures and one laboratory each week.
BIO 3384 Histology
A systematic cytological and histological study of animal tissues and organs with an introduction to basic histological procedures. Two lectures, two laboratories each week.
BIO 3394 Pathogenic Microbiology
The study of pathogenic microorganisms, their mode of transmission, infection and control as they relate to humans. Bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic diseases will be studied. Three lectures, one lab each week.
BIO 4404 Pathophysiology
The study of human diseases and the mechanisms that govern them. Four lectures each week.
BIO 4444 Vertebrate Embryology
Study of the embryological development of the vertebrate and controlling mechanisms involved. Two lectures, two laboratories each week.
BIO 448(1-3) Biological Investigations
Opportunity for qualified biology majors to conduct investigations in association with staff members on an acceptable phase of biology. By arrangement.
BIO 498(1-3) Biological Internship
A course designed to give the student on-the-job experience in the area of student's major. The purpose is to gain practical experience and enhance the student's educational preparation at SBU.

Environmental Biology/Field Biology

BIO 2214 Environmental Biology
An objective contemporary study of the environment and man's effect upon it. A holistic approach is taken in studying relevant problems relating to population growth, pollution and the preservation of natural ecosystems.
BIO 3544 Wildlife Biology
A study of the principles and techniques used to manage and measure animal populations. Topics include managing endangered species and game animals, the impacts of habitat fragmentation on wildlife populations, and the use of habitat corridors. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
Eight hours of elective courses from the following:
BIO 3314 Microbiology
A study of the cultural characteristics, morphology, metabolism, taxonomy and infection of microorganisms, with emphasis on methods of isolation, growth and identification. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
BIO 3354 Plant Taxonomy
A study of the principles of classification and nomenclature, a survey of the major vascular plant families and the identification of local plants. Two lectures, two laboratories each week.
BIO 4414 Freshwater Biology
Study of the freshwater ecosystem. The course is designed to include four major areas: water chemistry, including characteristics of lakes, rivers and streams; plankton, including algae and zooplankton; fisheries; and aquatic entomology. Three lectures, one laboratory each week.
BIO 448(1-3) Biological Investigations
Opportunity for qualified biology majors to conduct investigations in association with staff members on an acceptable phase of biology. By arrangement.
BIO 498(1-3) Biological Internship
A course designed to give the student on-the-job experience in the area of student's major. The purpose is to gain practical experience and enhance the student's educational preparation at SBU.
CHE 3002 Environmental Chemistry
The study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects and fates of chemical species in water, soil, air and living environments and the effects of technology thereon. Two lectures per week.

General Biology Concentration

Sixteen hours of elective biology courses. (At least twelve hours must be level 3000 or higher).