SBUBolivar, Missouri Est. 1878

Degree Requirements

Clubs & Organizations

Related Majors

Questions? Contact

Christine M. Saladino, Ph.D.
BSW Program Director
(417) 328-1740
csaladino@sbuniv.edu

Visit the Department of Behavioral Sciences website for more information.

Social Work

Social work is a practitioner-oriented degree.

SBU’s social work program prepares students in a Christian context to practice as competent generalist practitioners in diverse settings worldwide.

A Bachelor of Social Work degree prepares students with the knowledge base, professional values, and skills to professionally intervene with individuals, families, groups, and communities in diverse practice settings. The BSW program prepares students to be generalist social work practitioners or to go on to study in a Master of Social Work (MSW) program. In most states, students who have a BSW degree are eligible to apply for social work licensure.

Accreditation

The Southwest Baptist University Bachelor of Social Work degree is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

The SBU Advantage

  • SBU’s BSW program is built upon a liberal arts foundation and emphasizes the integration of Christian and social work values.
  • The BSW degree is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Admission

Students who wish to be admitted to SBU’s BSW program must first qualify for admission to the university and may declare a pre-social work major. Formal application to the BSW program should be made by spring of the student’s sophomore year. Decisions for entrance into the program will be made each spring and admission into the program will only be for fall semesters. The BSW Program of SBU will not grant course credit for life experience or previous work experience. Download the application and admission requirements.

Engaged Learning

Volunteer experiences and field placements provide students with hands-on learning and opportunities for academic and professional growth.

Field Education

The Bachelor of Social Work Program at SBU is committed to socializing students to perform the role of a generalist practitioner through Field Education.  Field Education has been identified as the signature pedagogy of social work by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).  A signature pedagogy “represents the central form of instruction and learning in which a profession socializes its students to perform the role of practitioner” (CSWE, 2008).  BSW students entering Field Education will be given the opportunity to choose from a wide array of practicum settings.  It is in this setting, students will have the ability to see the concepts, principles, values, and theories discussed in the classroom come to life.  Additionally, these experiences will equip the students with the necessary knowledge and skills needed to obtain professional social work positions upon graduation. 

The BSW program is excited about the opportunity to provide field education as a pathway for a successful transition into the social work profession!  We are committed to guiding and supporting you through your field education experience and are looking forward to the opportunities you will have to make a lasting difference in the lives of generations to come.  Please feel free to contact us with any questions or comments you might have.

For more information see the Field Education Manual.

Course Information

A Bachelor of Social Work in Social Work requires 57 hours in addition to general education and graduation requirements.

For more information, download the BSW Program Student Handbook and the Suggested Four-Year Plan.

Clubs and Organizations

  • SBU’s Tau Upsilon chapter of the Phi Alpha Honor society recognizes students who have demonstrated a commitment to the standards, ethics, and goals of the social work profession through their attainment of academic excellence, not only in social work education, but also in all other academic areas, as well as their dedication to the idea of service to humanity. Eligibility requires being accepted into the social work program and having declared a social work major; completing eight semester hours of required social work courses; achieving an overall grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; and achieving a 3.25 grade point average in required social work courses.
  • The Social Work Club promotes and practices the knowledge, values, and skills of generalist social work through community service, education, and social events.

Scholarships

Evelyn Mercer Social Work Legacy Scholarship: The Evelyn Mercer Social Work Legacy Scholarship is founded to honor the vision, service, and dedication of Evelyn Mercer, MSW, LCSW who served as a SBU faculty member for 23 years. Under Evelyn’s leadership, countless students learned about social work, and many became professional social workers as a result of her influence.

Internship Opportunities

Field Education has been identified as the signature pedagogy of social work by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). BSW students entering Field Education will be given the opportunity to choose from a wide array of practicum settings. It is in this setting that students will have the ability to see the concepts, principles, values, and theories discussed in the classroom come to life.

Career Opportunities

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics and the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the social work profession is growing faster than average for all occupations, especially in the areas of aging and health care services. There are currently more than 640,000 professional social workers employed in the United States.

Social workers work in a wide variety of employment settings, such as hospitals, schools, hospice agencies, child welfare organizations, adoption agencies, mental health organizations, aging services, correctional institutions, homeless shelters, domestic violence programs, military, churches, government and pregnancy resource centers.

Degree Requirements

Prerequisite courses for application to the Social Work program:

PSY 1013 General Psychology
A life-oriented course including physiological backgrounds of behavior, development, motivation, emotion, intelligence, personality, adjustment and social psychology.
SOC 1003 Introduction to Sociology
Survey of major subject areas and principles of sociology. Topics of the nature and development of culture; social aspects of personality; population trends, social classes, institutions and social change.
PSY/SOC 2001 Sophomore Seminar
This is a topical course emphasizing the content of the major and the APA (American Psychological Association) style of writing.
SOC 2012 Human Diversity
This course is designed to expose students to the wide range of diverse human perspectives found in our society. Content will focus on cultural influences, global connectedness, and understanding the universality and diversity that characterize humans.
SWK 2003 Introduction to Social Work
This course will provide students with a broad overview of the profession of social work. Specific attention will be given to social work’s historical background, ethics and values, practice settings, and historical and current social welfare policies.

The following courses are required for the BSW degree for a total of 57 hours:

SWK 2233 Introduction to Research
This course will provide students with an overview of the various research methods in the behavioral sciences. Specific attention will be given to the different methods of assessment, evaluation, and research inquiry found in the fields of psychology, sociology, and social work.
SWK 3013 Integrating Faith and Social Work Practice
This course explores the basic tenants of a Christian worldview and compares and contrasts them with the underlying values and theoretical basis of social work. Students will be encouraged to develop personal insight and understanding on how to integrate Christian principles and values into social work practice. Additionally, considerations for social work practice with other faiths likely to be encountered in practice settings will be explored.
SWK 3043 Social Work with Diverse Populations
This course prepares students to work with diverse groups in local and global settings. Identifying and developing skills for culturally competent social work generalist practice will be emphasized in this course.
SWK 3063 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I
This course is the first of two Human Behavior and the Social Environment courses required for social work majors. The class focuses on the biological, psychological, and sociological development of individuals across the lifespan, emphasizing a systems perspective. Theoretical frameworks of understanding a person’s behavior in their social environment will also be emphasized.
SWK 3073 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II
This course is the second of two Human Behavior and the Social Environment courses required for social work majors. The course introduces students to knowledge, theories, and concepts about human behavior within the context of groups, organizations, and communities. Special emphasis will be placed on learning and understanding the functions and effects of racial, ethnic and cultural diversity as they relate to macro theories.
SWK 3113 Social Work Practice I: Helping Skills
This course is the first in a series of four social work practice courses. It will introduce the student to fundamental knowledge and skills necessary for professional generalist social work practice.
SWK 3123 Social Work Practice II: Individuals
This course is the second in a series of four social work practice courses. The purpose of this course is continued preparation for generalist social work practice with an emphasis and focus on micro level social work practice with individuals.
SWK 3133 Social Work Practice III: Families and Groups
This course is the third in a series of four social work practice courses. The purpose of this course is continued preparation for generalist social work practice with an emphasis and focus on practice with groups and families.
SWK 4013 Social Welfare Policy
This course is designed to introduce students to social policy development and policy analysis. Discussion will include the social, political, and economic forces that shape policy. Attention will also be given to major social welfare policies and programs in the United States.
SWK 4143 Social Work Practice IV: Communities and Organizations
This course is the fourth in a series of four social work practice courses. The purpose of this course is continued preparation for generalist social work practice with an emphasis and focus on practice with communities and organizations.
SWK 4256 BSW Seminar and Practicum I
This is the first of two seminar and practicum courses designed to assist students to discuss and evaluate their field work experiences. The course will facilitate and reinforce the application of social work values, ethics, knowledge, and skills in field settings. Students will complete 200 hours in their field placement as part of this course.
SWK 4266 BSW Seminar and Practicum II
This is the second of two seminar and practicum courses designed to assist students to discuss and evaluate their field work experiences.  The course will facilitate and reinforce the application of social work values, ethics, knowledge, and skills in field settings.  Students will complete 250 hours in their field placement as part of this course.
PSY 3033 Abnormal Psychology
Major psychoses, psychoneuroses, sexual adjustment and an analysis of childhood background which leads to mental breakdowns, phobias, compulsions and hysteria.
PSY 3243 Elementary Statistics
Measurement, averages, variability percentile rank, normal curve, correlation, chi-square and probability related to the behavior sciences.

The BSW degree also requires 9 hours of social work supportive courses to be taken from the following:

BIO 3304 Anatomy and Physiology
Areas of study will include: the nervous, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, and the urogenital systems.
PSY/SOC 4333 Child Abuse and Neglect
A study of child abuse and neglect with consideration given to causes, symptoms, treatment and prevention. A special section is included dealing with the treatment of adult survivors of child abuse.
PSY/SOC 4053 Dealing with Death and Dying
An examination of how society and its institutions, the individual and survivors view and are affected by the process of dying and death. Guidelines are provided to enable the students to aid others and themselves in dealing with death and dying.
PSY/SOC 4373 Being Human and Addicted
A study of the effects of drugs on the human being, issues of physiology, psychology, sociology and religion will be addressed as they relate to chemical dependency. An overview of treatment methods and therapy will be included.
SOC 3033 Family Violence
This course examines the issues of violence in the family and the various implications in both treatment and society’s response. Applications of the law in the State of Missouri will also be addressed.
SOC 3023 Sociology of Gender
This course is an overview of sociological concepts and perspectives on gender.
SOC 4033 Criminology
A study of sociological theories of crime and delinquency, of crime control including punishment and treatment, and of practices and organizations of police, courts, probation and parole departments and prisons.
SOC 4083 Gerontology
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the theories of aging, the way the aging individual relates to the social systems, adjustment patterns of the aging and societal issues confronting older Americans.
SWK 2953 Special Topics in Social Work
SWK 4953 Intensive Studies in Social Work

Assessment Outcomes